Ahouse consists of many parts that hold it together, some structural and some operational. All parts need to be maintained and repaired occasionally to keep the house in tip-top shape. One system in the home that might be neglected is the HVAC system, simply because it’ soften unseen. HVAC systems are responsible for environmental comfort and indoor air quality, and it’s essential to maintain them for the purposes of safety, damage prevention, and money savings.

 

Safety

 

In locations that experience extreme climates, having a functioning heating system and air conditioner can often be life-saving. However, the frigid winter months affect more than just your body temperature. When you’re away from home and the HVAC system malfunctions, the freezing cold can create issues for your property. A broken heating system is a potential disaster for homes in colder climates; for example, frozen pipes could burst, which could then quickly turn into a costly home repair.

 

Clean Indoor Air

 

An important reason to have a clean HVAC system is for better indoor air-quality. A poorly ventilated home could mean that you’re breathing in dust, mold, allergens, toxins, formaldehyde, and even radon gas. Routine maintenance of your ventilation system will not only keep your home safer, but it will also improve the air you breathe. A properly maintained HVAC system should have clean filters and coils that prevent dirt, grime, and mold from spreading throughout your home. For cleaner air, consider adding a HEPAair  purifier with a clean filter. These mechanical air filters trap dirt and dust particles that would otherwise end up in your lungs.

 

ChangeYour Filters

 

Air filters don’t just filter out bits of dust, pollen, or other allergens — they also serve as the first line of defense against larger objects getting pulled into the system. Changing your air filter is essential, but the frequency of when to change it depends on a variety of factors, from the size of your home to the number of pets you may have and even the air pollution around your home.

 

During the summer months when the air conditioner is running, the air filters inside your unit get dirty easily. There’s a constant cycle of air coming in and out of the house, with a mix of stale indoor air and polluted outdoor air. A dirty filter could also cause a coil to freeze, but you can affordably replace an AC filter yourself. If your AC unit is frozen and replacing the filter doesn’t fix the problem, then call a pro to fix the AC unit.

 

CleanYour Coils

 

Among the many important parts to any HVAC system are the evaporator coils, which are essential to ensuring that your AC blows cool air. When the system is routinely used, condensation can build quickly, and dirt and mold growth could occur. To clean the coils yourself, remove the access panel and use compressed air, a brush, cleaning spray, mild detergent, or a pressure washer. However, keep in mind that an HVAC technician might be needed for heavier cleaning jobs.

 

Check Your System

 

You can’t fix it all yourself, but you can still check, detect, and call an HVAC professional when you spot a problem that needs repair. The key is to know what to look for. A well-maintained system can benefit your health and save you money on expensive repairs. For example, calling an HVAC professional to service your furnace before the winter can prevent damage from leaks, blockages, and mechanical and electronic failings. In the interim, minor issues have DIY solutions that you can troubleshoot and attempt to fix yourself.

 

When there’s a crack in the window, you immediately notice because it is visible. However, when there’s a malfunction in the heating ducts, you might not realize it’s happening because it’s less noticeable. This is why it’s important to check your HVAC system regularly before small issues turn into big problems. While HVAC systems take up a chunk of home utility costs, maintaining your heating and cooling units will lead to cost-savings and, most importantly, comfort.

 

PhotoCredit: Pixabay

Ray Flynn | DiyGuys.net

ray.flynn@diyguys.net